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Sedona – Cottonwood Info

Cottonwood-Sedona-Cornville, Arizona Real Estate

DEAD HORSE STATE PARK

Despite its distinctive name, Dead Horse Ranch is situated amidst an abundance of life along the Verde River.  A six-mile reach of the river is known as the Verde River Greenway. Its unique ecosystem, the Cottonwood / Willow riparian gallery forest, is one of less than 20 such riparian zones in the world. Life along the river changes with the seasons, giving visitors a glimpse of the numerous species of raptors, nontropical migrants, resident songbirds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. 

The developed portion of Dead Horse Ranch State Park covers 423 acres. The 3,300 foot elevation accounts for the mild temperatures that are ideal for camping, mountain biking in the Coconino National Forest, hiking along the Verde River, canoeing, picnicking, fishing, or just wading in the cool water

RED ROCK STATE PARK

Arizona’s famous Oak Creek meanders through this scenic park, creating a diverse riparian habitat abounding with plants and wildlife.

The family-oriented trail system is well marked for your safety and pleasure. The 5-mile network consists of interconnecting loops, which lead you to vistas of red rock or along the lush greenery of Oak Creek.

The Eagle’s Nest Loop and the Apache Fire Loop are joined together by the Coyote Ridge Trail. Eagle’s Nest is the highest point in the park with an elevation gain of 300′.

These three major loops are connected along the riparian corridor by the Kisva Trail, which also leads up to the short loop of the Yavapai Ridge Trail. The Javelina Trail takes you into the pinyon/juniper woodlands and back to the other loops. Rattlesnake Ridge rises just above the Twin Cypress Picnic area. Stop by the Camp Verde visitor center desk for detailed information before starting out on the trails. Bikes and horses are only allowed on designated routes

 

JEROME STATE HISTORIC PARK

Jerome Arizona’s history is full of stories. These stories tell how the “Wickedest Town in The West” got its name and how men who sought their fortunes in this billion dollar Arizona mining camp lived, played and fought. 
Once the fourth largest city in the Arizona Territory, Jerome boasted a population of nearly 10,000 on its hilltop haven. During its heyday, men and women from all over the world made their way to Arizona to find work and maybe a new way of life. 
Today, when you visit Jerome and its historic buildings, you are given an opportunity to take a step back in time, feel the past and experience life as it might have been in Arizona’s rough and rugged days.